• AnonymousI got a Q for you. Does WAC have a summer semester or offer any classes at all during the summer? Nice blog btw, I like your photos.
  • Thank you! I’m not sure if there are summer courses offered at the school. However, I know that there are some classes with residing professors abroad, such as Kiplin Hall for those interested in English. “During the three-week Kiplin Hall program, students attend lectures each morning and participate in field excursions in the afternoons… Students have an opportunity to explore areas where Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, and other influential literary figures found so much inspiration.”

    http://www.washcoll.edu/departments/english/kiplin-hall-trip.php

    Also, there is a Maine summer course for biology students. They go to Maine and do biology stuff… “The summer course BIO 210: Community Ecology of Coastal Maine is offered by the Department of Biology at the Mount Desert Island Biological Lab just down the road from Bar Harbor, Maine and includes daily field trips into Acadia National Park. The course addresses the ecology of terrestrial and marine communities in the park and offers exciting experiential opportunities in a beautiful setting.”

    http://www.washcoll.edu/departments/biology/maine-summer-course.php

    And WAC is partners with CISabroad, a company that connects us to schools that offer summer classes in Argentina, Australia, China, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Edcuador, England, Francd, Ghana, Hawaii, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Peru, Scotland, South America, and Spain.

    Also, there are a lot of research and internship opportunities. For example, in the summer of 2013, History students interned at the National Portrait Gallers, the American Art Museum, the Library of Congress, the National Constitution Center, the Maryland State Archives and the U.S. House of Representatives. You can read more about it at The Elm, our school newspaper: http://www.washcoll.edu/live/news/3335-money-to-learn-paid-summer-internships


    Point being, WAC offers a lot of different opportunities over the summer. If you really wanted to take classes that they don’t offer in the summer term, you can always take classes at your local community college. You’d have to make sure the credits transfer over before you signed up, but that’s a really easy process. Just a form. The registrar office is pretty efficient.

    Hope this helps. Emailing registrar@washcoll.edu will give you more information if you’re still interested. Best wishes!
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  • AnonymousCan freshmen get singles in terms of housing?
  • It’s very hard to get a single, especially for freshman. Most freshman who have singles get them because of a medical reason. You can apply for special accommodations due to a medical condition. However, those applications are reviewed and must meet certain requirements. Most of my friends who have medical singles have them because they have extreme OCD.

    Here’s an exert about them from the school website:

    "Special Accommodations
    If you require special housing accommodations due to a documented medical condition, please make a note on the housing preference form in the section titled Special Circumstances. These requests must include: a current statement of the medical or mental health diagnosis by the appropriate treatment professional, the treating professional’s discussion of the functional impact this diagnosis has on community living, and the requested accommodation. Requests will be reviewed by committee. Most buildings do have single rooms, however most have been chosen by upperclassmen and limited space is available for incoming students.”

    I think it’s important to note there is no stigma against people in medical singles. However, you don’t want to take one away from someone who really needs it.

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  • AnonymousOkay, so I had two questions. You seem to take a lot of pictures around campus so I too wanted to take pictures, any recommendations on what type of camera I should bring when I come to campus? I have a phone camera but I want to take pictures how you be taking them, all perfect and all. My second question is how is the dating life in college? I saw pictures of you and your boyfriend/date at the birthday ball thingy and was wondering if its hard sustaining a relationship? like with classes etc
  • Aw, thank you! I brought two of my favorite cameras to school. I have so much fun running around taking pictures. But in the end, it really doesn’t matter what kind of camera you bring. All the pictures I post on my blog are taken by my phone. I have an iPhone 4s and the camera is really underrated. It’s probably one of the reasons I got the phone. It’s always good to have a camera on you. You never know when the perfect photo opportunity will arise. 

    As for the dating life at Washington College, I’m probably not the best person to ask. I lucked out and within the second week met the love of my life. He’s the guy in the picture I posted for Birthday Ball. We have been together for seven months and I couldn’t be happier. It’s funny because we spend so much time together, it feels like we have been together for so much longer. 

    Let me tell you, dating in college is completely different than in high school. You live with in a five minute walk from each other and if you don’t eat every meal together, you see them nonetheless. The campus is small and that’s great; you see a friend almost everywhere you go. That’s comforting. But of course, that can make the awkward almost boyfriend material encounter extraordinarily awkward.  

    Because the campus is so small, everyone basically know everyone, if not by name, then by face. That is one of the things I love about this school because it has such a feeling of community. However, that also means people talk. Everyone seems to know everyone else’s business. So you have to be careful about how you act. Now, in my opinion, that can be a good thing. Some people really need the threat of their reputation to keep themselves in line, but I’ll admit, it can be tough. 

    In college, everything is more serious. Of course, there are the guys looking for the one night stands, but there are also the guys looking for the future wife. (I know, how terrifying does that sound?) 

    My last year of high school I had senior associate director of admissions, Tony Littlefield come to my school and talk to prospective students. He said that we would probably end up marrying someone we meet here. I thought he was insane. I considered myself a strong independent woman who didn’t need no man. But it’s funny because he was probably right. Although college should not be viewed as a dating program, it’s funny how compatible some of the people here are. In admissions, they are looking for a broad range of students to accept, but we all have certain things in common. You may very well meet the love of your life. 

    Sustaining a relationship at college is more complex than in high school. You have so much freedom in time and how you spend it. It’s hard to force yourself to get an early start on an essay when all you want to do is spend the time with the person you are dating. Time management in general has been the hardest thing for me to, well, manage. It’s tough. It takes time to learn how to do it. But once you build that self restraint, you will be fine. 

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The magnolia trees are so pretty. The flowers smell so good. Anywhere you walk on campus you can smell them. It is absolutely delightful.

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